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#lamonogram recomendado: history cool kids, píldoras de entretenimiento histórico



 

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New York City, 1981.⁣ ⁣ Photographed by Miron Zownir:⁣ ⁣ “We live in a world preoccupied with glamour, entertainment, phony sentiments and (empty) political righteousness. It is a kind of moralistic straightjacket that suffocates any controversial opinion. I believe in the freedom of thought—whether it conforms or not.⁣ ⁣ I’m still surprised that my preoccupation with marginal characters always raises the same question, “Why?” Why not? Whatever the fucking reasons are, for me it’s so obvious.⁣.. ⁣ Just look at NYC now. Those photos document a time and place at the zenith of its mania that no longer exists. Or to say it with the words of Lydia Lunch, who wrote the foreword to the book: these photos were done ‘long before the family-friendly gentrification and capital gain criminality white-washed NYC of all its kaleidoscopic perversions, in order to make it safe for anyone who could afford the ridiculous rents charged for shoebox-sized apartments…'”

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En el gran espectro de entretenimiento al que estamos expuestos, cada vez más se están creando fórmulas para introducir contenidos didácticos, a la par que amenos de leer. Porque sí, entre estación y estación del metro, hay quien prefiere leer una buena historia directamente desde Instagram, aunque no tenga un libro a mano, que jugar al Candy Crush, por ejemplo. Así nace History Cool Kids, una cuenta que ya tiene casi 700k de seguidores y que, llevada por Dain Lee, nos descubre píldoras de información histórica a través de una sola imagen o video. El creador de la cuenta se sumerge en la propia Historia en sus diferentes campos (política, sociedad, deportes, cine, personajes históricos, etc) y muestra imágenes curiosas nunca o muy poco vistas, que esconden historias dignas de ser contadas y que han escapado a los focos de la agenda de noticias diaria, pero que vale la pena conocer por ser únicas. Así, podemos conocer los secretos en el plató de Tiburón, historias de heroicidad como la del astronauta Ronald McNair que sufrió racismo en una biblioteca que ahora tiene su nombre, cómo una marca de chicles primero lo fue de jabones o cómo la icónica pareja del álbum de Woodstock, siguen juntos 50 años después. ¿Alguien dijo scroll?

 

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Bobbi and Nick Ercoline, the couple on the iconic Woodstock album cover are still together after 50 years.⁣ ⁣ “I try to explain that photo as a couple of 20-year-olds who were in love with each other. It’s us. That’s who we are. Still. You can still find us holding hands and hugging each other. Still,” said Nick.⁣ ⁣ Decades later, he is still smitten and very much in love with Bobbi. His advice for an enduring relationship: “A lot of communication. Don’t go to bed mad at each other. It’s a give-and-take. Choose your battles.”⁣ ⁣ The couple first met at a local diner in upstate New York when Bobbi was with another man in February of 1969. “She was gorgeous, are you kidding me? Long, blonde hair, she was a gorgeous girl. She’s a gorgeous woman,” Nick said.⁣ ⁣ Via: @historic

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A group of friends pose by a memorial of the 1692 Salem witch trials, 1945.⁣ ⁣ In 1976, Linnda R. Caporael, a professor at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, wrote a paper called “Ergotism: The Satan Loosed In Salem”, which proposed the theory that a fungus in bad bread caused the symptoms of “witchcraft” which drove the townspeople of Salem to persecute one another.⁣ ⁣ Ergot is the name of the fungus, and it grows on rye and related plants. When ingested by humans it can cause a variety of symptoms such as convulsions, choking, hallucinations or gangrene (causing the limbs to fall off). If one were to stop eating the tainted bread early enough, they may be able to recover. This explains why some people who were suffering from “demonic possessions” and sought refuge in churches and stopped eating low-grade rye bread were miraculously healed. Members of the clergy were able to afford higher-quality bread and thus didn’t suffer from the poisoning as often as the commoners. ⁣ Ergot poisoning was quite common during the Middle Ages and killed a lot of people in Europe in quite horrific ways. There is a strong correlation between wet summers (ideal conditions for ergot growth) and reports of witchcraft. In Norway and Scotland, records of witch persecution were only found in areas where rye was grown and used to make bread.⁣ ⁣ #salem⁣ #ryebread ⁣ #witchcraft

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The ice baby-carrying device was invented in 1937 by hockey player Jack Milford so that he and his wife could carry their baby on ice.

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